Welcome to www.n-georgia.com Discover the Marietta Military Cemetery in Marietta Georgia - With the death toll rising rapidly during the Civil War, the idea to bury war dead in national cemeteries was conceived in 1862.
Free Stuff To Do In Georgia Georgia Overnight Accommodations Shopping in Georgia Videos of places and things to do in Georgia Georgia Jobs and GA Department of Labor Weather in Georgia Maps of places in Georgia Contact Us Advertise in N-Georgia.com

Home
Georgia Travel Regions
Georgia Coast and Islands
Georgia Festivals and Events
Georgia Lakes
Georgia Fishing Lakes
Georgia Rivers
Georgia Waterfalls
Georgia National Parks
Georgia State Parks
County Parks
Georgia Wildlife
Georgia U S Forests
Georgia Farmers Markets
Georgia Gardens
Georgia Civil War Sites
Georgia Historic Sites
Georgia Museums
Georgia Plantations and Observatories
Georgia Audubon Society
Georgia Covered Bridges
Georgia Driving Tours
Georgia OHV Trails
Georgia Bike Trails
Georgia Horseback Riding Trails
Ourdoor Activities Safety Tips
Georgia Tourist Centers
General Info
Many people mistakenly believe that the cemetery at Gettysburg, dedicated so eloquently by President Lincoln in the Gettysburg Address, was the first such cemetery. However, by the time it was built others existed from Annapolis, Maryland to Fort Smith, Arkansas.

With the death toll rising rapidly during the Civil War, the idea to bury war dead in national cemeteries was conceived in 1862. Many people mistakenly believe that the cemetery at Gettysburg, dedicated so eloquently by President Lincoln in the Gettysburg Address, was the first such cemetery. However, by the time it was built others existed from Annapolis, Maryland to Fort Smith, Arkansas.

During the Atlanta Campaign, and later "The March to the Sea," Union and Confederate dead were buried across the fields of Georgia. Henry Greene Cole, a prominent Marietta citizen and owner of Cole's, an inn near the railroad depot, proposed the idea for the Marietta National Cemetery. Also supporting the idea was Dix Fletcher, owner of Fletcher House. Both men were ardent Unionists.

Cole offered a few acres of land near downtown for the cemetery, and the offer was eventually accepted by the federal government. The cemetery was to contain the graves of both Union and Confederate dead. However, Marietta officials did not want Confederate dead to be buried near Yankee dead, so they formed a separate Confederate Cemetery.
Over the next three years Union soldiers from Dalton to Augusta were disinterred and reinterred at the Marietta National Cemetery. These men had been buried with wooden gravemarkers, and by 1869, when the last group was transferred, many of the markers and the names were gone. Over 17,000 men are buried here, more than 3,000 of them unknown. Many of the men died during the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain, and a total of 10,172 died during the Civil War.

In addition to running the Marietta National Cemetery, Cole and Fletcher worked for the Western and Atlantic Railroad after the war. Although many Southerners had doubts about both Cole and Fletcher's loyalties during the war, none of the suspicions were ever proven, although Mr. Cole did spend a few nights in a Confederate jail in South Carolina, suspected of being a Union spy. He was released after Joseph E. Johnston surrendered in April, 1865.

Entrance to the grounds is through an arch on Washington Avenue. The grounds has a number of ways to locate markers. A number of states have erected monuments to the slain men buried on the beautifully landscaped grounds.

Amenities: Parking, Public Restrooms, Accessibility for mobility-impaired
Hours of Operation
Monday through Friday 8 am to 4:30 pm. Closed federal holidays except Memorial Day and Veterans Day. Visitation Hours: Open daily from sunrise to sunset.
Phone - Address & Website
Phone: 770-428-5631 or toll-free at 1-866-236-8159 – Address: 500 Washington Ave., Marietta Georgia 30060 - Directions from Hartsfield Airport: The cemetery is located in downtown Marietta. From Hartsfield International Airport, take Interstate 75 North to North Marietta Parkway (Exit 265). Turn left at traffic light and proceed to Cole Street approximately one mile and turn left. Continue on Cole Street for four blocks. Cemetery is at the corner of Cole Street and Washington Avenue.
Marietta National Military Museum
Loading


Atlanta Travel Region Map and Info
Print a Metro Atlanta Georgia Travel Region Map

Bullet

Metro Atlanta Georgia
BulletFestivals & Events
BulletFree Outdoor Activities
BulletFun Activities $5 & Under
BulletTourist Centers
BulletTravel Region Info

HomeFree Stuff To Do - Festivals & Events - State Parks - County Parks  - Georgia National ForestsWildlife Areas    
WRD Archery & Firearms Ranges - National Parks Services Sites - Horseback Riding Trails - OHV Trails - Bike Trails - Driving Tours
Covered Bridges - Historic Sites - Museums - Coast & Islands - Rivers - Lakes - Fishing Lakes - Waterfalls - Gardens - Planetariums -
 - Maps - Videos - Safety Tips - Dept of Labor - Privacy Policy -  Contact

Website created and Copyright ©1999 - 2017 by. All rights are reserved. Website updated on 12/1/2017