Welcome to www.n-georgia.com Discover Georgia National Park Service Trail of Tears - Come on a journey to remember and commemorate the survival of the Cherokee people despite their forced removal from their homelands in the Southeastern United States in the 1840s.
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Numerous programs and activities are available at developed sites and in communities along the Trail of Tears National Historic Trail. Contact individual sites and tourism centers for more info.

Non-federal historic sites, trail segments, and interpretive facilities become part of the Trail of Tears National Historic Trail through certification. This is a voluntary process in which an owner or manager agrees to adhere to National Park Service standards for resource preservation and visitor use. Look for the official trail logo at all certified locations.

Public lands and state, county, and city parks along the trail route preserve trail resources. Although not yet certified, they may be open for public use. Other trail sites are on non-profit or private property and may not be open to the public.
National Park Services Partners
The National Park Service partners with federal agencies, state and local governments, organizations, tribes, and private individuals to administer the national historic trail. The Trail of Tears Association is a major partner with the National Park Service. The association is a national organization dedicated to the preservation, public awareness, and appreciation of the Trail of Tears. Visit the Trail of Tears association website.

There were several other American Indian tribes that were removed along with the Cherokee on the Trail of Tears. Members from these tribes are partners on the national historic trail. To learn more, visit the following websites:
BulletChickasaw Nation
BulletSeminole Nation of Oklahoma
BulletPoarch Band of Creek Indians
BulletUnited Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians
For Teachers
Teaching about the Trail of Tears - A lesson plan on the Trail of Tears is available for educators and students through the National Park Service's "Teaching with Historic Places" program. The plan focuses on the John Ross House and Chieftains, the home of Major Ridge, which are national historic landmarks in Georgia.
NPS Trail of Tears
Fees & Reservations
There are no user or entry fees for the Trail of Tears National Historic Trail. Nominal fees may be charged at some trail-related federal, state, or locally owned historic sites and interpretive facilities.
Contact Us
National Trails System - Santa Fe
Phone: 505-988-6888 - Fax: 505-986-5214
Address: Old Santa Fe Trail Building, 1100 Old Santa Fe Trail, Santa Fe, New Mexico.
Interesting Trail of Tears Facts
Not all Cherokee people were removed from their homelands to Indian Territory (present-day Oklahoma) on the Trail of Tears. The Oconaluftee Cherokees had treaty rights, and they, along with fugitives fleeing the army, became the Eastern Band of Cherokees, still residing in N. C.
The Trail of Tears National Historic Trail is approximately 2,200 miles long, over land and water routes in nine states.
In 1838 U.S. Army troops under General Winfield Scott's command rounded up Cherokee people and moved them to forts in North Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, and Tennessee, prior to their removal west. 31 forts were built for this purpose on the Trail of Tears National Historic Trail.
Three detachments of Cherokee people were removed from their homelands to Indian Territory (present-day Oklahoma) along water routes, while 11 detachments made their way overland along existing roads. These routes are part of the Trail of Tears National Historic Trail.
In 1838 U.S. Army troops under General Winfield Scott's command rounded up Cherokee people and moved them to forts in North Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, and Tennessee, prior to their removal west. 31 forts were built for this purpose on the Trail of Tears National Historic Trail.
After their removal to Indian Territory (OK) in the late 1830s, Cherokee people established tribal government headquarters in Tahlequah, developed a constitution, and maintained a bilingual school system. Their experiencess are commemorated on the Trail of Tears National Historic Trail.
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